Back to the Beginning

Just the other day, the Folger Shakespeare Library sent out a tweet asking how and when followers first found their love of Shakespeare. I eagerly wrote back because I not only could tell you exactly when I fell in love with Shakespeare, but I also am about to return to my first and favorite play, … Continue reading Back to the Beginning

Shakespeare Books for Kids Part 2!

The baby is napping...for now...so we’re back for part 2. In part 1, we looked at adaptations of A Midsummer Night’s Dream to see what the current offerings are and how they present the play for kids. This selection covers Shakespeare the man and the word he lived in. It’s easy to underestimate the importance … Continue reading Shakespeare Books for Kids Part 2!

Children’s Shakespeare Adaptations

I had to write all of this while my one month old was occupied, so proofreading is sorely lacking...apologies 🙂 Since I just had a baby and most people in my life know that I’m a giant Shakespeare nerd, I find myself with a decent collection of Shakespeare books for children. Shockingly, I do not … Continue reading Children’s Shakespeare Adaptations

Prince of Sorrows Review

Prince of Sorrows by D.K Marley, author of Blood and Ink, provides a unique perspective in this adaptation of Hamlet. Marley took on quite the challenge when she chose to adapt such a well-know play. There will hardly be a reader who doesn’t already know the story. She faced that challenge head-on and did a … Continue reading Prince of Sorrows Review

Exploring Teaching Objectives: Shakespeare Isn’t Scary!

I personally feel that the most important teaching objective of my program will be the idea that Shakespeare is something that does not have to be scary. It is undeniable that Shakespeare was a genius, but does he have to be put on this pedestal? Yes and no. Yes, Shakespeare should be respected as one … Continue reading Exploring Teaching Objectives: Shakespeare Isn’t Scary!

Sign Language Shakespeare

  This is a young woman performing a speech from Romeo and Juliet for a show done in American Sign Language. I think both Sign Language and Shakespeare are important to kids, so this is an interesting blending of the two.

Is there a loser and a winner in Shakespeare adaptation?

I finished briefly scanning a book titled Shakespeare Translated by H.R. Coursen. I only read the introduction and conclusion because I needed general statements and the majority of book analyzes specific examples, which for my purposes was not helpful. Anyway, he argues in the book that attempting to adapt Shakespeare into a more modern context, … Continue reading Is there a loser and a winner in Shakespeare adaptation?