Hamnet Shakespeare | Breaking Bard Ep 20

https://radiopublic.com/breaking-bard-a-ripe-good-scholar-G3DxPV/s1!74992 Trigger Warning: Child Loss “If William Shakespeare wrote about his son’s death at all, he concealed it in the lines of his late sonnets and plays that reveal a depth of understanding about grief.” - Vanessa Thorpe, Alas, Poor Hamnet, The Guardian Because there is so little known about Shakespeare’s private life, we are... Continue Reading →

Antony and Cleopatra Part 1

Act I, Scene 1Philo and Demetrius are disappointed in Antony. He used to be so full of manly war feelings, but now all he wants to do is dote on Cleopatra. Antony and Cleopatra are discussing how great their love is when a messenger arrives from Rome. Antony doesn’t want to hear it, but Cleopatra... Continue Reading →

Expertise of the Doubters

I believe that William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon wrote the plays attributed to him. At the beginning of the year, I wrote a blog post explaining why I feel it is worth understanding the arguments behind the authorship debate and why the debate is worth having. My intent is to go through the arguments and key... Continue Reading →

Does It All End Well? | Breaking Bard Ep. 19

https://radiopublic.com/breaking-bard-a-ripe-good-scholar-G3DxPV/s1!94aef “Shakespeare’s unpleasant young men are numerous. Bertram, as a vacuity, is authentically noxious.” - Harold Bloom in Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human As I reached the end of All’s Well That Ends Well, I found myself asking: but does it all end well? Helena, by all accounts a wonderful woman, ends up married... Continue Reading →

The Complex Family Dynamics of King Lear

TW: emotional abuse, violence, dementia As I was watching the Stratford Shakespeare Festival’s recent stream of King Lear, I was confronted with a feeling I didn’t expect: empathy for Goneril. This was my first experience with King Lear and all I had heard was that Lear was horribly abused by his two evil daughters. I... Continue Reading →

King Lear Part 3

Act IV, Scene 1While reflecting on his sorry state, Edgar sees his father being led by an old man. It quickly becomes clear that Gloucester has no eyes. The old man is one of Gloucester’s tenant farmers. Gloucester doesn’t want his help for fear that they would punish the old man. They notice “Poor Tom”... Continue Reading →

King Lear Part 2

Act II, Scene 2Kent, the King’s messenger, meets Oswald, Goneril’s messenger, outside of Gloucester’s castle. Oswald appears not to recognize Kent as he asks him where to tie up his horse. Kent does not take too kindly to this and unleashes a barrage of insults onto Oswald. (Probably unleashing years of bottled up contempt.) He... Continue Reading →

Shakespeare and Plague | Breaking Bard Ep. 18

https://radiopublic.com/breaking-bard-a-ripe-good-scholar-G3DxPV/s1!f4e6e “I could draw forth a catalogue of many poore wretches, that in fields, in ditches, in common Cages, and under stalls (being either thrust by cruell maisters out of doores, or wanting all worldly succor but the common benefit of earth and aire) have most miserably perished.”-Thomas Dekker “The Wonderful Year” The bubonic plague... Continue Reading →

King Lear Part 1

Act I, Scene 1Kent and Gloucester discuss which of the King’s son-in-laws will likely inherit the kingdom. At first, it seems he preferred the Duke of Alban, but now it’s hard to tell. Kent turns to Edmund and asks Gloucester if that’s his son. It’s not. It’s his wife’s son though. Gloucester uncomfortably rags on... Continue Reading →

The Truth About Prince Hal | Breaking Bard Ep. 17

https://radiopublic.com/breaking-bard-a-ripe-good-scholar-G3DxPV/s1!1cbb3 “From his father’s usurpation of Richard II’s throne in 1399, when Henry was but twelve, he was active in the government of England. […] Henry V came to the throne extensively experienced in politics, administration, and warfare: few kings have been so well trained for their job.” - Peter Saccio in Shakespeare’s English Kings... Continue Reading →

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